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Der Anfang

Hogarth nahm 2008 aus einem Dachgeschoss in der Nähe der Londoner Carnaby Street den Geschäftsbetrieb auf. Unsere Internetverbindung kam durch ein Kabel, das aus dem Fenster hing, und der Boden war so schief, dass die Bürostühle ständig in eine Ecke rollten. Doch schon bald waren wir 14 Leute in dieser Dachkammer. Für Meetings mussten wir auf das brasilianische Café gegenüber ausweichen – bei uns war es einfach zu eng. Und weil wir uns sehr gern an diese Zeiten erinnern, werden die Gründungsmitarbeiter von Hogarth noch heute die „Attic Fourteen“ („Vierzehn vom Dachboden“) genannt.

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Gender Pay Gap Report 2017

March 2018

Purple H icon

Hogarth Worldwide: Gender Pay Gap Report 2017

March 2018

Introduction

At Hogarth we strive to create a working environment where everyone is treated equally regardless of gender, ethnicity, age, religion, sexual orientation or disability.  We pride ourselves on creating a diverse and balanced workforce (for example 33% of our UK workforce originates from outside of the UK) as we believe this is a true representation of Hogarth’s values work and ethos.

The “Gender Pay Gap” is defined as the difference between the average earnings of all men and women in an organisation.  This is a separate issue to equal pay, which is the ethical and legal requirement for people carrying out the same or similar work to be paid equally, regardless of gender. Thus an organization can be entirely compliant with equal pay legislation, but still have a Gender Pay Gap if the different genders in the workforce are not equally distributed as far as seniority and experience are concerned. It is now a requirement for all UK companies with over 250 employees to publish their Gender Pay Gap data.

Results

In the UK we have a gender balanced workforce.  53% of our workforce are women and 47% men.  However, there are fewer women in the UK at the senior executive level where pay is highest and consequently we have a Gender Pay Gap.  Our female representation at executive level is primarily non-UK based and forms part of our Global Leadership Team (GLT).

Our pay gap reflects the lower proportion of women in upper pay bands in the UK. The bonus gap is larger than the pay gap as in more senior roles performance based, variable bonuses represent a potentially greater proportion of total remuneration. A disproportionate number of these senior roles are currently held by men.  Due to historically inconsistent timings with bonus payments our current figures, which are reported under strict legally defined formulae, include two years of annual bonus figures, which artificially increase this figure.  We do not anticipate this inconsistency to re-occur.

Gender Pay and Bonus Pay Gap
Difference between men and women Mean (average) Median (middle)
Gender Pay Gap 26.7% 22.0%
Gender Bonus gap 78.7% 20.0%

Gender Proportion Who Receive a Bonus
Male 11.2%
Female 9.4%
Pay Quartiles No. of Employees Males Females Split
Quartile 1 179 71 108 40 : 60
Quartile 2 179 59 120 33 : 67
Quartile 3 179 112 67 63 : 37
Quartile 4 179 120 59 67 : 33

Statement

We confirm that the information in this report is accurate and prepared in accordance with the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.

 

Richard Glasson                          Jeremy Thompson

 

 

CEO2345               CFOPicture1

Hogarth Worldwide:  A Global Business

At Hogarth, we pride ourselves on being a global business.  To give a representative picture of Hogarth Worldwide we have also chosen to share our worldwide consolidated data.  Globally our mean Gender Pay Gap stands at 17%.  This is significantly more favourable than our UK gender pay gap because there is a better balance of female employees in more senior roles are employed outside the UK.

Our Commitments

Hogarth is committed to improving the gender balance of our management and senior leadership teams, which is the key to tackling our Gender Pay Gap.  We know that our Gender Pay Gap is not an equal pay issue but one of representation issue in senior roles.

The following commitments reaffirm our position on this:

  • We have always recruited and will continue to do so solely based on merit.  We believe opportunities should be available to all and we will continue to challenge ourselves to be as inclusive as possible and to never discriminate.
  • To encourage flexible working wherever practically possible. We will continue to ensure we take a consistent approach to ensure career development is not in any way impacted by factors such as taking any form of parental leave such as for maternity, paternity or adoption.
  • To review all relevant Hogarth UK policies, practices and procedures (such as maternity leave and flexible working) so they are consistent with objectives of reducing the Gender Pay Gap over time.
  • We will continue to carefully measure our progress both under the umbrella of the mandatory reporting and with further internal measures.

Initiatives

Hogarth is also committing to a number of additional initiatives in the UK and globally.

The impact of these initiatives is unlikely to be instant, therefore we anticipate a gradual improvement over the coming years:

  • Unconscious bias training will be rolled out across the UK in 2018.
  • A thorough review of the mechanism of our pay review structure to ensure that the process does not risk gender related bias.
  • Relevant training to our Global Leadership Team which currently has a 44% female representation at a global level.
  • Supporting employees who would like to join Bloom (a professional network for women in communications) by providing membership subscriptions for conferences and events.
  • Analysis of data from exit interviews to identify common themes for employees leaving Hogarth that could influence the Gender Pay Gap.
  • We will be launching affinity groups in the UK.

Modern Slavery Statement

Modern Slavery Statement

Our Group’s Organisational Structure

WPP is the world’s largest communications services group. We are made up of leading operating companies in: Advertising; Media Investment Management; Data Investment Management (formerly known as Consumer Insight); Public Relations & Public Affairs; Branding & Identity; Healthcare Communications; Direct, Digital, Promotion & Relationship Marketing; and Specialist Communications.

WPP plc’s main management offices are located in London and New York and we have hubs in India, Singapore, Hong Kong, Seoul, Shanghai, Tokyo, Sydney and São Paulo.

Within the WPP group, which includes WPP plc and our operating companies, we directly employ 128,000 people and, when associate companies are included, we have approximately 190,000 people working in 3,000 offices located in 112 countries.

Our Policies

We do not tolerate any form of modern slavery or human trafficking in any part of our business. This commitment is outlined in our Human Rights Policy, which reflects international standards and principles including the International Bill of Human Rights, the UN’s Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, the International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work and the Children’s Rights and Business Principles.

Our commitment is also reflected in our Code of Business Conduct, our Sustainability Policy and our Code of Business Conduct – Supplier Version. These policies inform and influence all of our business practices and all operating companies are required to adhere to these policies. However, implementation of these policies are determined at operating company level and is their
responsibility.

Due Diligence in Our Business and Our Supply Chain

We have conducted an internal risk assessment and ascertained that as a professional services firm the risk of trafficking or slavery in our direct workforce is very low.

The WPP group has a large global supply chain as WPP and our operating companies buy goods and services from thousands of suppliers around the world. WPP have a central Commercial and Procurement Services (C&PS) team and they manage the appointment of “preferred suppliers”, where contracts are entered into the WPP parent level. A “preferred supplier” is defined as one that has been appointed following evaluation against a variety of assessment criteria, including risk, operational, commercial and sustainability considerations. WPP expects all suppliers to abide by the same principles outlined in the WPP Business Code of Conduct. As part of our contracts with suppliers, it is a mandatory requirement that they either sign the WPP Code of Business Conduct for Suppliers or confirm their adherence to their own Code of Business Conduct that comprises of the same principles.

As part of a due diligence exercise, we have assessed the risk of modern slavery amongst our “preferred suppliers” with whom we have a direct contractual relationship across nine categories
within our supply chain. We also assessed one unique group of “preferred” and non-preferred promotional goods suppliers, as they are considered our highest risk category. Following the
development of an internal tool, which covers country and category risk, we have now mapped and graded the risk of modern slavery among these suppliers.

Each WPP operating company is required to use WPP’s “preferred suppliers” for commonly purchased goods and services, whenever possible. In addition, each operating company is expected to maintain a list of locally preferred suppliers based upon the formal selection process outlined in WPP’s procurement policy. It is the responsibility of our operating companies to select, monitor and manage any suppliers that they use if they are not listed on WPP’s central “preferred supplier” list. We are currently reviewing WPP plc’s existing procurement procedures to assess whether more extensive modern slavery considerations should be integrated into our due diligence process for working with suppliers.

Monitoring

WPP have a third party managed “Right to Speak” helpline that is in place throughout the business and is overseen by WPP’s legal and internal audit departments. All employees (direct and indirect) have access to this helpline where they can report any concerns or suspected cases of misconduct, including suspicions of forced labour or trafficking activities. This is publicised through induction packs, the Group intranet, the WPP Policy Book and our ethics training. Each operating company is
responsible for ensuring that all employees are informed about the helpline.

WPP recently launched a new sustainability programme that will enable us to work with our operating companies and encourage them to embed our sustainability standards across all their business operations. The programme involves a variety of activities including assessment, onsite visits and awareness training that will allow us to identify any gaps relating to sustainability issues, including risks around modern slavery. As part of this programme, we will develop key performance indicators for modern slavery risks that will enable us to monitor and manage the issue within all our business operations more efficiently.

Training

In early 2017 we conducted compulsory onsite training with WPP’s central Commercial and Procurement Services Team on the risks and issues of modern slavery within our business and supply chain. We will be extending this training to other teams within WPP and our largest operating
companies.

We have also issued guidance to our operating companies reiterating that we do not tolerate people trafficking or forced labour, and providing examples of risk areas. It is the responsibility of our operating companies to ensure that this is communicated to all employees within their operations.

Next Steps

WPP is committed to maintaining high ethical standards, protecting human rights and acting with honesty and integrity in everything we do. We endeavour to understand where there are risks of modern slavery within any part of our business and supply chain so that we can address them
appropriately and sustainably.

WPP is a dynamic group with ever evolving business operations and so we recognise that there are always improvements that can be made to the way we work. We regularly review and refine our policies and procedures. WPP plc will continue to expand and extend the work we do in our Sustainability Programme to our operating companies as part of our efforts to eliminate all forms of forced labour and human trafficking from our operations and supply chains across the group.

Mr Paul Richardson
Group Finance Director,
WPP plc

How to get ahead as a Woman In Technology with Nicole Meissner

Publication EGR Technology spoke to Head of Digital Nicole Meissner about bringing more women into technology. A walking example of the benefits that diversity can bring to a company, Nicole’s advice here is well worth a read. You can visit EGR Technology here.

EGR Technology: How did you end up getting into the tech sector?

Nicole Meissner (NM): I was just interested in changing things and transforming experiences of how the world is being perceived. As of today, that’s very much driven by technology. For me, it wasn’t a question of do I get into tech or not. It was more about how can I really change perceptions and experiences and that ended up being tech.

 

EGR Technology: Can you describe the technical aspects and responsibilities of your role at Hogarth?

NM: I run the digital part of the production agency. I’m looking after the delivery of every single project, which includes all the customer engagement, defining experiences and building them. We’re finally beyond just looking at websites and mobile apps but more omni-channel in the sense of handing over touch points and what that means for a customer experience. Gender content is finally becoming more important so a bank doesn’t just see someone who gets a mortgage but what’s behind that and how better to target the people behind the message.

 

EGR Technology: At Hogarth, are there any specific initiatives to encourage more women into tech roles within the company?

NM: We started looking closer into that last year. The gender diversity within Hogarth is very well developed. Overall we’re looking at a 50/50 split. Even if I just look at my tech teams, particularly in Asia, you’ll find a lot of female developers. We believe very much in training people and also enabling them to marry their home life with their professional work life.

I’m a big supporter of programmes like Girls Who Code so we’ve started looking into starting a similar project here. What’s important is to enable a gender balance so you get a good set of female developers and project managers integrated into your daily work otherwise how can you define a female experience if you never have anybody female in the group?

I believe it is crucial to go down to the schools, in particular secondary schools, and help girls have these experiences with technology. So they can realise they can code, can think about tech and not just be consumers of tech. Hogarth wants to start a similar project this year here in London.

EGR Technology: What are the challenges of being a woman in a male-dominated industry?

NM: As a woman I perceive the world from my own gender identity. I think it’s very important if you are in technology to know what you are talking about. But I think that’s the same in every other area. If you have the confidence and competence I’m sure you’re being listened to and doors will open.

 

EGR Technology: Why do you think the number of females in techie roles is still so low?

NM: I have two teenage daughters myself and a lot of the education these girls will be receiving in so-called ICT subjects is shocking. Often they do programmes like a computer driving licence which helps them create a Powerpoint or do a matrix in an Excel spreadsheet and that’s really not what technology is. And it has nothing to do with the world they will be growing in to. So the subject is utterly boring, uninspiring and not future proofing their knowledge.

If you grow up like that through your teenage years it will be really difficult for you, even if you’re a science scholar, to choose any ICT or computer science subjects. We’re not seeing a curriculum, we rarely see role models and we don’t see any investment in that area.

EGR Technology: What advice would you give to young women who are considering technology as a career?

NM: I certainly would encourage them. I think women are more needed than ever in technology to build the solutions we need for tomorrow. If you want a futureproofed job and you don’t want to work in a job which 10-20 years down the line is no longer around, hop on the technology wagon.

Striking The Right Balance

The increased inclusion of women in tech, alongside the advertising industry in general, is an important issue to Hogarth – the nature of our business means diversity isn’t just a watch-word but a fact of life for us. Our Global Head of Digital, Nicole Meissner, was recently interviewed as part of a piece in EGR technology asking professional women in tech on how to address the gender imbalance in technology – reproduced below. You can view the original on EGR Technology here.

Striking the right balance

EGR Technology finds out why there are relatively so few women taking up tech roles and how there needs to be a shake-up at the education level to address the gender imbalance

Melanie Dayasena-Lowe

In the 1840s, Ada Lovelace became the world’s first computer programmer at a time when mathematics was considered to be ‘a man’s work’. But through the support of her mother, Lovelace, the daughter of poet Lord Byron, wrote the world’s first machine algorithm for an early computing machine invented by mathematician Charles Babbage. However, while nearly 200 years have passed since Lovelace’s gender ‘breakthrough’, some of the barriers she had to overcome arguably still remain today.

Despite a huge gender equality drive in the 1900s, which continues into this century, the UK tech industry in particular remains a largely male-dominated sector. According to a recent survey by BCS/Tech Partnership, just 17% of all technology roles are currently held by women. Worryingly, that lowly figure has remained flat over the past few years, meaning there has been no further ground made on rectifying the significant gender imbalance.

A major cause of concern is a recent survey carried out by UK technology training and apprenticeship organisation QA, which found that half of all women in tech roles had previously been discouraged from forging a career in the tech industry. In order to improve the ratio of women in tech, 80% of women said they would need more female role models in tech, while 76% did not view technology as an attractive career path when at school.

Lovelace remains one of the leading role models for female tech wannabies, which highlights the need for more modern day heroines. The likes of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Apple SVP for retail Angela Ahrendts, Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer and Lastminute.com founder Baroness Martha Lane-Fox are those banging the drum today, but the issue runs deeper than a lack of inspirational figures.

Many believe having a diverse workforce is necessary to bring a variety of viewpoints and ideas to the table, which in turn brings benefits to a business. It’s also crucial to have a female perspective when it comes to creating products and experiences for consumers, explains Nicole Meissner, chief digital officer at production agency Hogarth Worldwide. “How can you define a female experience if you never have anyone female in the group?” she asks.

Early intervention

Former Sony executive and past president of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Naomi Climer believes the lack of female technologists and engineers is an inherently British problem and one that has caused the UK to lag behind its European counterparts. “We’re the worst in Europe and strikingly behind other territories such as China or Eastern Europe,” she explains. “It’s a big challenge to shift an entire nation’s stereotypes.” Climer, who became the first female president of the IET in its 145-year history, believes parents, teachers and employers all have major roles to play but argues there needs to be a much broader effort to elicit change.

The lack of females in technology roles is not because companies don’t want to hire women into tech jobs but is more to do with the lack of female applicants in the first place, argues Bill Walker, CTO for QA. Walker says this goes back to schools and universities and the stereotyping of technology roles.

“It’s seen as a male oriented job which then becomes self-perpetuating,” explains Walker. “A good example is software development – this is very much a creative job, and yet we have plenty of world renowned female artists, photographers, potters, jewellery makers  – the only difference is that the computer has replaced the paint brush/potting wheel. But the art of designing software is no different to being able to draw a landscape.” He believes if we can demonstrate the creativity that technology allows someone to bring to the workplace then the industry will be in a much stronger position to attract a greater number of female candidates.

One of the fundamental issues behind the lack of women in tech is at the education level, where not enough females are studying technology-related subjects at school or university. PwC’s recent Women in Tech research report found that just 3% of females say a career in technology is their first choice. The results also found that females aren’t considering technology as a career option because it either isn’t being put forward as an option to them or they aren’t being given enough information at school about what working in the sector involves.

The UK recently acknowledged the need for a greater focus on technical careers. In its Spring Budget, the Chancellor unveiled a £500m investment in technical education for 16-to-19 year-olds. The new T-Levels, expected to be introduced from 2019, will enable students to choose from 15 different career routes such as construction, digital, engineering or agriculture. And while the money isn’t directed at young women specifically, it is thought the greater awareness of career outcomes the course will bring could result in a more balanced gender take-up.

Back to basics

However, there remains plenty of work for schools and universities to do to try and encourage, and certainly not discourage, more young women to take up a career in technology. Claire Tran, who is a software engineer at classified ads website Gumtree and a City Lead for Women Who Code, says when she was growing up technology just wasn’t promoted among girls and believes there’s a definite need to make sure technology is taught in the right way. “I was taught by someone who didn’t know how to programme,” she adds.

Jody Conibear, head of strategy and planning, group technology at Sky, says tech roles are still considered niche and sometimes misunderstood, so it’s all about introducing children to technology in the right way. “I don’t think the teaching population has the skills or the equipment to give the best experience to children when they’re learning IT and tech,” she remarks.

But just because Britain appears to be struggling at selling technology as an attractive career path, that doesn’t mean other nations are too. For instance, in Finland there’s a radical new approach being taken in schools where children are learning to code informally before the age of seven. Conibear argues that it is just like learning another language and that children in Britain would benefit from learning similar at a younger age.

PwC has also been working with educational bodies in a variety of ways to get more school children engaged with technology careers. The firm recently organised an event for 100 schoolgirls to promote technology as a career and this year took on 150 apprentices straight from school. “We see that as a key way to bring more people into tech and we’ll definitely be targeting women,” explains Sheridan Ash, women in tech leader at PwC.

And of course, if women aren’t attracted to roles in technology in their early years, it means the pool of talented women for technology companies to pick from is severely limited further down the line. In an effort to address this, security firm Symantec actively supports an effort called TeenTech. Symantec has a goal to excite, engage, and educate one million students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education (STEM), with an emphasis on computer science and cybersecurity, by the year 2020. Sian John, EMEA chief strategist at Symantec, says the one-day learning events are aimed at changing the somewhat dated perception of what a career in technology is like.

The diversity drive

As well as working with education bodies, businesses are seeing the importance of driving diversity in their workforce through internal initiatives, sponsoring external groups and hosting talks and workshops to attract more women into technology. Sky has been particularly proactive in pushing forward initiatives to encourage more women across the company.

For the past two years, the broadcaster has been running its Women in Leadership scheme across the whole of the business to make sure it has a diverse organisation from top to bottom. The programme has seen a 7% increase of women in leadership positions over the course of the initiative, which now stands at 38%.

Within the technology side of the business, which employs 4,200 staff in the UK, 20% of the workforce is made up of women – slightly more than the national average. In some areas such as networks, TV and IT infrastructure engineers, females are very under-represented, while in software engineering and broader project management teams this jumps much higher and is above 25%. Other initiatives from Sky include retaining and developing its internal female workforce and mandating a 50/50 balanced shortlist for all new roles where possible.

One of Sky’s most successful programmes has been the Get into Tech initiative, where women with little or no previous technical experience can learn some of the skills necessary to begin a career in software development. The scheme has seen more than 100 women enrolled on a free course to learn foundation skills in coding.

“What we’re trying to do is address quite an imbalance we saw in our software academy, particularly in apprentices and graduates which is about 10% women,” adds Conibear. “We have around 70 new joiners each year through the academy and it just wasn’t acceptable for us to continue like that. Our aim is to get to 50/50. We’re aiming for 30% female intake this year which is a massive improvement.”

Meanwhile for start-ups, if gender balance is a focus from the outset it’s much easier to maintain that balance as the business grows. As was the case for data analytics firm Aquila Insights, which has a high proportion of women in the workforce, with 57% female and 43% male, as diversity was one of the key principles that guided Aquila’s founders. “If diversity is being attended early in a company’s life, naturally a more robust work environment will be created, the pipeline of candidates will be affected and the number of female candidates passing the interview process and accepting an offer will increase,” explains Sevy.

 

Flexible working

One of the main reasons why women are said to be either overlooked for top jobs or fail to put themselves forward is around family life and flexible working.

According to PwC’s Ash, its women in tech initiative, which has been ongoing for three years, has focused on getting the basic rights by looking at how the consultancy firm attracts, retains, advances and develops women.

“We were losing a lot of our female technologists when they went on maternity leave as they either didn’t come back or came back, weren’t happy with their roles and left,” she says.

One of the schemes set up to help mothers is called ‘maternity mates’, designed to support female employees throughout their pregnancy, during maternity leave and on their return to work. The maternity mate, who could be a senior staff member who is a mother or father, will actively mentor and sponsor the pregnant colleague throughout.

Flexible working has also been a focus for Sky. Not only has the company been using gender balanced panels when recruiting staff, but in order to attract more females into roles they have made clear that flexi-working is an option. “We changed our job descriptions to have much more female-friendly language and a strapline ‘happy to talk flexible working’,” explains Conibear.

A recent survey from recruitment firm Robert Walters and British job board Jobsite found that 76% of female tech professionals in the UK said businesses offering remote working would be more likely to retain top talent while 72% considered career progression opportunities important to keeping employees happy.

However, Ady Sevy, product manager at data analytics firm Aquila Insight, is quick to dismiss the stereotype of the tech industry being really demanding in terms of hours of work and the work/life balance. She highlights that in software development a lot of companies are trying to be progressive in terms of their way of thinking. “I believe this whole work/life balance works really well in the hi-tech industry because you are less constrained to being in a specific location at a specific time,” she adds.

 

Breaking the mould

While the women who have forged a career in technology have had mainly positive experiences, some have found the need to prove themselves time and time again within a male-dominated environment. Sevy believes culture has a big part to play in this. “There is a sense of ego in the culture. Also a need to be more competitive and maybe not to be as transparent as I would like my work environment to be,” she adds.

Symantec’s John, who has had a positive experience as a women in technology, says she has faced the assumption that, because she is a women, she’s not as technically gifted as men. “You do find it sometimes,” she says, “you say something that gets ignored, but then it gets repeated by somebody else.”

John believes culture is key and says firms often find themselves falling into the trap of maintaining the status quo rather than trying to implement change. “If you’ve already got one dominating culture, you’re likely to hire people that are more like that,” she says. “There’s the same problem for men getting roles in HR. I don’t think it’s conscious though.”

As well as encouraging more young women to study tech subjects, there is also a need for more female role models to attract women into the sector. John at Symantec agrees that we need more role models showing that “it’s normal” for women to work in tech.

Until we see more females studying and being encouraged to take STEM subjects at school and universities, the numbers of female candidates for technology roles will continue to remain low. But if more companies invest in initiatives, promote female role models and work with schools to raise awareness of the importance of STEM, hopefully the gender gap in the tech sector will start to close.

With technology all around us as consumers and in business, Meissner encourages more women to take that leap of faith and follow a career in tech. “Women are needed more than ever in technology to build the solutions we need for tomorrow. If you want a futureproofed job, hop on the technology wagon.”

 

Gaming’s diversity push

Promising strides are being made to drive more women into tech roles within the egaming industry. Companies are very aware of the gender divide, and have been introducing initiatives to tackle it. Sky Betting & Gaming (SB&G), for example, is hosting a coding course for beginners at the Leeds Tech Festival this month. Head of service delivery at SB&G Rachel Watson says the company has a real need to support more women into well-paid tech roles. Its ‘Women in Tech Survey’ is challenging participants to rank issues like salary levels, support from male colleagues, corporate culture and visibility in order of importance. ”We’ve had a really good balance of responses with regards to age and seniority too,” Watson notes.

Similarly, the Kindred Group last month sponsored the Women in Technology Stockholm event, marking International Women’s Day. “The mission is to inspire talented women to consider a future in technology,” says Kindred Group head of communications Alex Westrell.

With only 25% of the operator’s total number of employees being female “improving these figures is a key driver in [our] efforts on diversity,” he says. Westrell adds the most common worry received from young women interested in technology was ‘am I good enough?’ “Our response to that was: we care as much about finding the right people as we do about great technical skills, and one of the best assets you have is yourself. You have to just dare to put yourself out there,” he adds.

Kindred CTO Marcus Smedman believes the number of women in the tech field is increasing across most markets. “I think it’s partly due to the fact that tech has become a much broader skill than just programming, and also partly the result of successful companies such as Amazon and Apple,” he says.

“There is a still a long way to go, but I hope the trend we see is just the start and we continue to move into a more balanced mix of techies.” Smedman, who has worked in IT for 27 years and the last six within egaming, says the areas with the least female involvement are those “closer to the bare metal – like network infrastructure and traditional database domain.” He suspects a shift as cloud techniques and global operations are creating new challenges.

Another trying to rebalance the industry is NetEnt CEO Per Eriksson. “I think it’s still very much a male-dominated industry, but if you want to have a good gender balance, you can reach it for sure,” he says. NetEnt is year on year edging closer to bridging the gender gap, with 2016 marking a male-leaning 42/58 balance. Their longer term target is to reach 50/50 by 2020. “That doesn’t mean pouring women into jobs that are typically dominated by females. I want a balance in all departments.” He believes one way to attract more women is to outwardly express a desire to work towards a balanced workforce.

CEO of egaming developer BtoBet Kostandina Zafirovska is encouraging women to “consider the good side of working in a male-dominated industry”. She claims it’s easier to grow in an environment where all the attention is on you as the only woman. BtoBet can boast a gender ratio of 50/50, with senior roles like CMO, project manager, support manager and technical manager all carried out by women.

Girl power

Inspiring women share their words of wisdom for young women wanting to pursue a career in tech

“Believe in yourself and have confidence. Don’t be afraid to be creative. And join a support network. It’s a chance to learn and grow yourself. You’re not alone. You don’t have to struggle getting into tech.” – Claire Tran, Gumtree

“They should think of this as a business career. It’s not just about coding, it’s about understanding what customers want and it’s about understanding how a business operates. Tech is everything to businesses these days. Keep an open mind and think of this as a long and flexible career journey.” – Jody Conibear, Sky

“There’s never been a better time for women to get into tech and help close that gender gap. The range of skills needed in technology today is much broader. Digitisation means you need creativity, collaboration and relationship building skills.” – Sheridan Ash, PwC

“Go for it. The tech industry is one of those that can be flexible. You can work from different places. You are not as time constrained as long as you deliver the things you need to do. I believe the work/life balance works really well in the tech industry.” – Ady Sevy, Aquila Insight

“Don’t worry about what you think the image is. I’ve never met two women who are the same. Being in the minority when you know what you’re doing can actually be an advantage.” – Sian John, Symantec

How to Get More from your Advertising Budget

Our Chief digital officer, Nicole Meissner talks to about the best ways to make use of your advertising production budgets.

It’s often said, and is a fact, that one of the most expensive parts of the advertising cycle is production. So for that reason, it’s always a good idea to check back and see how you’re doing against agreed budgets. If you need to make sure your utilising the best of what you have, here’s a few ways to make sure you’re still on track.

 

  1. Do you know who you want to get to?

Sounds quite simple, but you’d be surprised how many still get this part wrong. Target audiences can be tricky especially as digital has opened up more channels to reach even more consumers. But who do you really want and NEED to get to?

Why? Mainly because there’s an automatic assumption that we need to target anyone and everyone who could possibly be interested in our product, service or platform, all without drilling down to those that really matter. Digital has also disrupted this process. As we’re in an ‘online’ world, there’s a tendency to widen the target net further and feel we should be across every platform. In reality, target audiences tend to be a lot smaller or they should at least start this way and grow as your campaign does.

Generally, you can narrow down your targets audience with a process of elimination through insight before you have perfectly defined your audience. In my experience, a campaign is more successful and targeted once you home in on who it should be aimed at. It will not only make it more successful (of course dependent on other elements), but you’ll find that this will help keep ad budgets and spend in line with what you originally set out. The more you focus, the better the outcome and the more targeted your campaign.

Quick tip: 1. think about who you want to get to and why. 2. Break it down. 3. Then break it down again!

 

  1. Think tech.

So what’s next? It’s time to think about how you’ll build your campaign and what you’ll use to get you there. Whether social media content, TV spots, print ads or banner campaigns, you should use a technology platform that allows you to reach audiences in different platforms – and preferably in one go. Often people think about the individual elements of a campaign and how it is displayed without thinking about how elements can get dynamically generated. There are a Digital Asset Management and ad building platforms such as Double Click, Flash Talking, Sizmek which offer an integrated, future-proof solution. The key is to think about smart production methods. But if you want to take the hassle out of doing it yourself, look for an advertising production agency to help you.

  

  1. Make the most of your assets.

Every time you build a new campaign, it doesn’t mean that you have to create new assets to run alongside it. Why does something need to be brand spanking new?

Re-using content and existing materials is a great way of keeping ad production budgets to a minimum. And if you’re worried that the content will look the same, there are many ways to adapt and tweak things so it doesn’t. Always think ahead as there will be elements and ideas you can easily use again – but in a different way. Try doing things from one central point. It’s all about centralising production to get the best outcome. And for brand consistency you may top and tail with the same look and feel, but it’ll be the content in between that changes. If you have a good production facility, they’ll be able to take multiple variations and blend content in a way that will look like new.

 

  1. Be creative.

Being creative poses a challenge as one idea may work well in one territory, but not so well in another. Then factor in the sheer nature of the campaign – the target audience, the outcomes, the mechanics, and how it will eventually look and be perceived – and it can often mean any creativity tends to go out the window. As dynamic and personalised content begins to take precedence, creativity will become more important.

 

  1. Stay focused.

We’ve all been victim to straying from initial plans. With so many variants, audiences, technology, engagements and interactions to think about, it’s easy to veer off track. It can be a challenge with some many activities happening simultaneously, but try to stay focused.

Final tip: take time to think back to where you want to get to – and most importantly – who you want to get to.

This article was originally published in Digital Marketing Magazine

Five ways to get more from ad production in 2017

Advertising production is one of the most expensive parts of the advertising cycle, so it’s always useful to revisit how you’re doing against agreed budgets. In More About Advertising, Nicole Meissner, Hogarth’s Chief Digital Officer gives her top 5 tips:

1. Who do you want to get to?
Target audiences – who do you really want and need to get to? Sounds quite simple, but you’d be surprised how many still get this part wrong.

Why? Mainly because there’s an automatic assumption that we need to target anyone and everyone who could possibly be interested in our product, service or platform, all without drilling down to those that really matter. Digital has also disrupted this process. As we’re in an ‘online’ world, there’s a tendency to widen the target net further and feel we should be across every platform. In reality, target audiences tend to be a lot smaller or they should at least start this way and grow as your campaign does.

Generally, you can narrow down your targets audience with a process of elimination through insight before you have perfectly defined your audience. In my experience, a campaign is more successful and targeted once you home in on who it should be aimed at. It will not only make it more successful (of course dependent on other elements), but you’ll find that this will help keep ad budgets and spend in line with what you originally set out. The more you focus, the better the outcome and the more targeted your campaign.

Quick tip: Think about who you want to get to and why. Break it down. Then break it down again!

2. Make the most of your assets.

Every time you build a new campaign, it doesn’t mean that you have to create new assets to run alongside it. Why does something need to be brand spanking new?

Re-using content and existing materials is a great way of keeping ad production budgets to a minimum. And if you’re worried that the content will look the same, there are many ways to adapt and tweak things so it doesn’t. Always think ahead as there will be elements and ideas you can easily use again – but in a different way. Try doing things from one central point. It’s all about centralising production to get the best outcome. And for brand consistency you may top and tail with the same look and feel, but it’ll be the content in between that changes. If you have a good production facility, they’ll be able to take multiple variations and blend content in a way that will look like new.

Quick tip: think long-term. What’s likely to change versus what isn’t for a while? Build around that. If you’re a smaller company, this will help you keep budgets to a minimum.

3. Think tech.

So what’s next? It’s time to think about how you’ll build your campaign and what you’ll use to get you there. Whether social media content, TV spots, print ads or banner campaigns, you should use a technology platform that allows you to reach audiences on different platforms – and preferably in one go. Often people think about the individual elements of a campaign and how it is displayed without thinking about how elements can be dynamically generated. There are a digital asset management (DAM) and ad-building platforms such as Double Click, Flash Talking and Sizmek, which offer an integrated, future-proof solution. The key is to think about smart production methods.

Quick tip: take a step back and think about what it is that you’re trying to achieve and make sure it aligns well with your chosen platform.

4. Be creative.

Being creative poses a challenge as one idea may work well in one territory, but not so well in another. Then factor in the sheer nature of the campaign – the target audience, the outcomes, the mechanics, and how it will eventually look and be perceived – and it can often mean any creativity tends to go out the window. As dynamic and personalised content begins to take precedence, creativity will become more important.

Quick tip: make sure your creative ideas are carried through the whole campaign so that nothing gets left behind. At key points, check back and remember to marry the creative with the technology!

5. Stay focused.

Above all, stay focused. It may sound blindingly obvious but we’ve all been guilty straying from initial plans. With so many variants, audiences, technology, engagements and interactions to think about, it’s easy to veer off track.

Final tip: always take time to remeber where you want to get to – and most importantly – who you want to get to. Good luck for 2017!

Meet the MD: David Hughes

David Hughes 1

David Hughes is one of Hogarth Worldwide’s UK Managing Directors – a unique role that sees him work closely with the various and diverse arms of Hogarth’s business. Recently profiled in Business Quarterly, here he gives an overview both of his role and of Hogarth.

What does your role include?

I’m MD of Hogarth in London which is actually several businesses in one; our core business of creative production for national and international clients, as well as our creative agency and media joint ventures.

London’s the global HQ. From here we manage many international clients and co-ordinate our EMEA offices across Dubai, S. Africa, Germany and Bucharest. My role involves running our London P&L with our UK management team – otherwise known as the three amigos’, Matt Kitcherside, Billy Mann and of course, myself.

 

What is it the company does?

We started life as a decoupled production business – so rather than a client/brand going to many agencies, they’d come directly to us to manage the whole production process – but now we do much more than this. We do creative production right through to media delivery of full marketing and advertising campaigns.

 

Give us a brief timeline of your career so far – where did you start, how did you move on?

I started my career working in integrated agencies. My last assignment was with Proximity BBDO where I ran the Shell business globally. This was one of Proximity’s biggest International clients.

I jumped ship to the smallest digital agency in London but I learnt a lot such as how to build Facebook Apps – some of the UK’s first – which gave me a great knowledge of social media very early on.

 

What do you believe makes a great leader?

Passion and vision. The ability to see the big picture and not get diverted by the slings and arrows. You need to keep going so I guess stamina is important too, as well as a very good sense of humour. You need to have the ability to get on with different people also helps.

 

What has been your biggest challenge in your current position?

Getting accurate data is crucial to managing a complex business. This was a challenge in the early days in a fast moving production business.  Data helps you make the right decisions and sometimes the systems we used in the past didn’t provide the data we needed.

Another challenge is keeping our talent pool red hot. We always need good people.

 

How do you alleviate the stress that comes with your job?

Exercise is pretty good stress reliever and my children are quite good at keeping me busy. I surf (badly) and have recently taken up yoga, which I enjoy. When I’m not doing either of those, I’m fishing or out in the countryside with my family.

 

When you were little, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Ocean Biologist. I still want to be one – maybe I am one in a small way!

 

Any pet hates in the workplace? What do you do about then?

Committees! We try and avoid them but they sometimes creep in. And I hate generic credentials for clients. They can always be tailored to what the client needs and their sector.

 

Where do you see the company in five years’ time?

A global production and media delivery powerhouse for WPP businesses and their clients, with a strong international hub network covering all key geographies.

 

What advice would you give to an aspiring business leader?

Don’t be shy. Follow the money.

Thanks to Business Quarterly for interviewing David.